Presentations

“Bridging ‘Siloed Spaces’: Building a Successful Librarian- Faculty
Partnership in First-Year Research-Based Courses”
Panel presenter at the International Writing Across the Curriculum Conference, June 2021, virtual
Abstract: This panel will discuss a successful librarian-faculty partnership that bridges the academic silos common on university campuses to enact sustained education of first-year research writing students. Librarian and writing faculty panelists will discuss how the Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing and the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education complement each other, how learner-centered pedagogy guides library instruction in our research writing courses, ways librarians and writing faculty can engage in shared inquiry, how our partnership connects students with interdisciplinary research, and how attendees can facilitate strong relationships with campus librarians. Attendees will learn how to foster effective librarian-faculty partnerships that rest on shared learning outcomes for students.

“Zine Quest: Alternative Pedagogy & Community Building” Peer-reviewed conference session for the Library Collective, March 2020 in Knoxville, TN
Abstract: Zines are powerful tools for self-expression, interrogating authority, and subverting homogenous media representation in the classroom. This interactive session will help attendees envision a pathway to improved engagement and community building through zines and other alternative pedagogies by combining elements of collaborative storytelling, character development, group strategizing, and play.

“Read Fewer Boring Papers: Empowering Your Students to Choose
Interesting Research Topics”
Great Ideas for Teaching Session presented at the UCCS Mountain Lion Teaching and Learning Day, January 2019

“Archiving Spotify: How and Why to Track Your Music Streaming
Data”
Lightning Talk Presented at the Society of American Archivists 2017 Annual Meeting Research Forum
Abstract: The possibilities of music streaming data are immense – we can track the trends in our own listening habits, note what songs we were drawn to during pivotal moments in our lives, even gain new insight into the habits of others. What playlist was an author listening to as they wrote the latest bestseller? What song did your mother have on repeat in the days before you were born? Music streaming data can illuminate each of these topics. However, Spotify makes this data especially difficult to come by, so managing personal music history takes some initiative and some simple tech tricks. By tracking, storing, and preserving their Spotify data, users can control the data they are creating that they wouldn’t otherwise have access to. This presentation will include an overview of how streaming music has affected archival work, why archiving this data is important, a few different methods for approaching this challenge, and practical recommendations for implementation.

“Feminist Perspectives in Library Services”, winning paper presented at 2017 University of Denver Interdisciplinary Research Incubator for the Study of (In)Equality (IRISE) Graduate Student Paper Competition (Slides)

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